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Healthcare Engagement Strategy Awards: Case Studies

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A wicked social media initiative by McNeil Consumer Healthcare (Division of Johnson and Johnson)

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FaceBook Healthcare-Related Ads (November 2010)

Here are some of the healthcare-related ads that were targeted to my personal profile on FaceBook during the month of November 2010.  All previous posts on FaceBook healthcare-related ads that targeted my FaceBook profile can be found here.

FaceBook ads stats feature of the month: Comscore.com reported that from July-September 2010, FaceBook had the top online ad impressions at 297 billion.  This represented over 23% of the online display advertising market.  I would like to know how many of these ads appeared on FaceBook profile pages (many of the ads that I post in my blog come from the FaceBook ad board, and not from my profile page) and how many clicks they got.

This month, I will comment on the ‘Will Grandma die’ FaceBook ad.  I am just one person, and my opinion on this ad is my own.  Others may have a similar or different opinion based on their experience and their personal preferences.  Therefore, I encourage you to add your feedback on this particular ad as well, whether you like it or not, or on any of the other ads included in this post as well.

I was drawn to comment on the ‘Will Grandma die’ ad because I am familiar with VirtualHospice.ca‘s unique and much needed services.  I like this particular ad very much because it targets an audience that may not be in an emotional state to search out this type of service, yet they could benefit so much from it.  Therefore, having an emotionally-charged ad flashed in front of them while they are on FaceBook, one that may hit home with the viewer, seems like an effective way to get the right person’s attention.  The title and text are well crafted in a simple yet very clear fashion.  The chosen image complements the copy very well.  In its entirety, this ad tells an emotional story quite effectively.  There is no branding of VirtualHospice.ca in the ad, but this is not what is important to their target audience.

Also, although there are no words that spell out the call-to-action, it is evident that the organization is trying to drive traffic to its website as the website is clearly listed below the copy.

In my opinion, VirtualHospice.ca did a fantastic job with this ad.

Here are other ads that appeared on my FaceBook profile over the month of November.  Note: Ddrops and Kidney Cancer Canada are clients.

Every once in a while, I see a non-FaceBook online healthcare-related ad that catches my interest.  I capture these in my FaceBook healthcare-related ads post as added value to you, the reader.

The GSK ad was found on the paper.li e-newspaper by Ddrops Company (client), Canadian-Mom-Bloggers.  For those not familiar with the paper.li e-newsletters, the posts and ads are automatically selected via the paper.li process.  The hosting organization has no control over what articles or ads appear.  The only control that the hosting organization has is either the Twitter hashtag that will be focused on, or the Twitter list.  I am a fan of paper.li e-newsletters, but I do wish that more prominence would be given to the originator of the article, and less to the person who posted it (but that’s another topic).

The other two were Yahoo ads.

Tell me what you think of these ads in the comments below.

Stay in touch,
Natalie

Connect with me on the following networks:

FaceBook, Twitter, LinkedIn

Telus social media case study: “Like to Give” campaign

Every once in a while, an organization stands out from the rest as a good corporate citizen.  For the past couple of years, I have been watching the good deeds by Telus which are positively influencing healthcare in Canada.  In fact, they are a sponsor of one of my favorite children non-profit organizations, Upopolis.  Here is a statement that is found on the Info tab of their FaceBook page:

We give where we live. TELUS supports local communities and charities across the country.

This week, I saw the following sponsored ad on my personal FaceBook profile:

When you click on the “Telus” link, you are brought to the “Like to give” tab on the Telus FaceBook page.

Update November 26 2010:  Pic with all 12 charities that were included in “Like to Give” Telus campaign

 

Telus allows comments to be added to their FaceBook posts, but they do not allow wall posts to be initiated by others.  I sent them a note on Twitter asking why this was the case, but 24+ hours later,  I still had  not heard anything from them.  My personal guess is that they do not allow others to initiate posts because they want to avoid negative dicussions being initiated by consumers on their page.  This seems to be an issue on the Telus YouTube channel.  Based on my research, Telus appears to get their fair share of negative comments on social networks by consumers, so if they want to avoid similar issues that Nestle had with their FaceBook page, they probably made the right choice by not allowing others to iniative wall posts.  Keep in mind though that the biggest issue with the Nestle case was the way that they handled the situation. However, Telus is allowing consumers to have a voice as as those who ‘like’ the Telus FaceBook page can add comments to posts initiated by Telus themselves.

Because of the high level of negative comments, I think it is wise that Telus’ Twitter strategy is to have a Twitter profile that is focused on marketing messages (@Telus) and one that focuses on providing consumers with support on Telus services (@TelusSupport).  This allows @Telus to remain focused on their positive marketing messages, whereas the @TelusSupport deals with all the questions and complaints.  However, I do find that the general @Telus account engages too little with the audience.  I did a quick monitoring check and noticed that several people have posted about Telus’ ‘Like to give’ campaign with a mention of @Telus.  This means that Telus does not even have to monitor to be aware of the mention – these public mentions can be found right there in their Twitter profile.  However, I have yet to see a ‘thanks’ sent out to any of those people, including myself.  This is not the end of the world, but it would be a courteous act which would humanize the organization in the eyes of consumers.

I would like to wish Telus and their chosen non-profit organizations the best of luck in reaching their goals with the ‘Like to give’ campaign.  I am not a client of Telus, but their acts of generosity certainly catch my attention.  If ever I am in the market to switch, Telus will at least be top of mind as part of my research.

What else would you like to see Telus do to promote their ‘Like to give’ campaign on social networks?

Stay in touch,
Natalie

Connect with me on the following networks:
FaceBook, Twitter, LinkedIn

FaceBook Healthcare-Related Ads (October 2010)

Here are some of the healthcare-related ads that were targeted to my personal profile on FaceBook during the month of October 2010.  Previous posts on FaceBook healthcare-related ads that targeted my FaceBook profile can be found here, here, here, here, here, here, here and here.

So far, I have not been commenting on any of the ads.  Starting as of now, I will select one ad to comment on per post.  I am just one person, and my opinion on these ads is my own.  Others may have a similar or different opinion based on their experience and their personal preferences.  Therefore, I encourage you to add your feedback on this particular ad as well, whether you like it or not.

My commentary on the “Do you have MS” ad by PatientsLikeMe.com :

What I like about this ad:

  • The title clearly identifies who should be interested in seeing this ad.  People who see the ad will know right from the start whether they should read further or not.
  • The website is identified in writing.  In this situation, the website address is the brand name.  Therefore it is beneficial to spell it out as part of the text of the ad, rather than just linking to the site.  Whether people click on the link or not, they are exposed to the website / brand name.
  • There is a clear call-to-action to join the community at no charge.
  • The value of joining the community is well established in the text;  sharing one’s experience with over 15,000 other people who are ‘like me’.

What I don’t like about this ad:

  • The visual used for this ad does not convey a wordless message that would be understood right away by the audience that they are trying to reach. By this, I mean that if all text were to be removed, the image would probably not draw the attention of their target audience, somebody with MS who is not a member of PatientsLikeMe.com.  However, I believe that the image may have meaning to target audience members after they read the title and accompanying text.

Was the ad successful?  Did the PatientsLikeMe.com MS community grow its member base?

Oftentimes, it is difficult to answer this question unless somebody who is part of the organization is willing to provide you with the data.  But in this case, we have a soft measure to share.  It appears as though the PatientsLikeMe.com MS community has grown as the ad stated that there were over 15,000 members in the MS community on PatientsLikeMe.com, whereas the website now states that their MS community consists of over 22,000 members, 579 of which are new members as of this month.  I say this is a ‘soft’ measure because the data on the ad is not realtime.  It appears as though the data on the website is real-time, but unfortunately I do not have access to the number of members of this community prior to the implementation of the FaceBook ad.  Of course, there are probably many other drivers for this growth in member base.

FaceBook advertising update: Have you noticed that you are now seeing 4 FaceBook ads on the right hand side of your profile instead of only 3?  This is a smart move on behalf of FaceBook.  This should encourage more people and organizations to advertise on FaceBook as they now have a greater chance to appear on the main real estate portion of the FaceBook ad – the Profile page.  I don’t have stats on this, but I highly doubt that many people click on the “More ads” button at the bottom of the ads that appear on their Profile page … unless they are geeks like me 🙂 .

This post is by no means an endorsement of any of the products or services depicted in the ads.  The ads were not scrutinized to determine whether they fit within the Canadian regulatory guidelines.

I want to hear from you.  What do you like or dislike about these ads?  Do you have any personal experience with FaceBook healthcare ads that you would like to share?

Stay in touch,
Natalie

Connect with me on the following networks:
FaceBook, Twitter, LinkedIn

FaceBook and Online Healthcare-Related Ads (July and August 2010)

Every month, I post healthcare-related FaceBook ads that appear on my FaceBook profile.  Since I took some time off during the Summer, I decided to post the ads that I saw during the months of July and August in one post.  Previous posts on FaceBook healthcare-related ads that targeted my FaceBook profile can be found here, here, here, here, here, here and here.

FaceBook is always changing things.  According to All FaceBook, we might see some changes in FaceBook ads, as they might have a four star rating.  That could be interesting for marketers, especially for those who test multiple ads.

This post is by no means an endorsement of any of the products or services depicted in the ads, nor is it a critique of the ads themselves.

Stay in touch,
Natalie

Connect with me on the following networks:
FaceBook, Twitter, LinkedIn

Yahoo ad:

FaceBook and Online Healthcare-Related Ads (June 2010)

Pharma companies are starting to be brave enough to use FaceBook as an advertising medium to reach the Canadian market.  This month, Bayer, Merck Serono, McNeil Consumer Healthcare and other healthcare organizations targeted me with FaceBook ads.  An detailed analysis of the campaign surrounding the Real MS Voices ad (by Merck Serono and Merck) can be found here:

Non-profit organizations continue to use FaceBook as an advertising avenue:

Medical providers also use FaceBook advertising with the hope of finding new clients:

Miscellaneous others:

And a few healthcare-related ads that I spotted on my Yahoo account (all of which I believe would be ideal for promotion via social media advertising and other activities):

Previous posts on FaceBook healthcare-related ads that targeted my FaceBook profile can be found here, here, here, here, here and here.

This post is by no means an endorsement of any of the products or services depicted in the ads, nor is it a critique of the ads themselves.

Stay in touch,
Natalie

Connect with me on the following networks:
FaceBook, Twitter, LinkedIn

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