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Telus social media case study: “Like to Give” campaign

Every once in a while, an organization stands out from the rest as a good corporate citizen.  For the past couple of years, I have been watching the good deeds by Telus which are positively influencing healthcare in Canada.  In fact, they are a sponsor of one of my favorite children non-profit organizations, Upopolis.  Here is a statement that is found on the Info tab of their FaceBook page:

We give where we live. TELUS supports local communities and charities across the country.

This week, I saw the following sponsored ad on my personal FaceBook profile:

When you click on the “Telus” link, you are brought to the “Like to give” tab on the Telus FaceBook page.

Update November 26 2010:  Pic with all 12 charities that were included in “Like to Give” Telus campaign

 

Telus allows comments to be added to their FaceBook posts, but they do not allow wall posts to be initiated by others.  I sent them a note on Twitter asking why this was the case, but 24+ hours later,  I still had  not heard anything from them.  My personal guess is that they do not allow others to initiate posts because they want to avoid negative dicussions being initiated by consumers on their page.  This seems to be an issue on the Telus YouTube channel.  Based on my research, Telus appears to get their fair share of negative comments on social networks by consumers, so if they want to avoid similar issues that Nestle had with their FaceBook page, they probably made the right choice by not allowing others to iniative wall posts.  Keep in mind though that the biggest issue with the Nestle case was the way that they handled the situation. However, Telus is allowing consumers to have a voice as as those who ‘like’ the Telus FaceBook page can add comments to posts initiated by Telus themselves.

Because of the high level of negative comments, I think it is wise that Telus’ Twitter strategy is to have a Twitter profile that is focused on marketing messages (@Telus) and one that focuses on providing consumers with support on Telus services (@TelusSupport).  This allows @Telus to remain focused on their positive marketing messages, whereas the @TelusSupport deals with all the questions and complaints.  However, I do find that the general @Telus account engages too little with the audience.  I did a quick monitoring check and noticed that several people have posted about Telus’ ‘Like to give’ campaign with a mention of @Telus.  This means that Telus does not even have to monitor to be aware of the mention – these public mentions can be found right there in their Twitter profile.  However, I have yet to see a ‘thanks’ sent out to any of those people, including myself.  This is not the end of the world, but it would be a courteous act which would humanize the organization in the eyes of consumers.

I would like to wish Telus and their chosen non-profit organizations the best of luck in reaching their goals with the ‘Like to give’ campaign.  I am not a client of Telus, but their acts of generosity certainly catch my attention.  If ever I am in the market to switch, Telus will at least be top of mind as part of my research.

What else would you like to see Telus do to promote their ‘Like to give’ campaign on social networks?

Stay in touch,
Natalie

Connect with me on the following networks:
FaceBook, Twitter, LinkedIn

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5 Responses

  1. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by karthick lakshman, Nat Bourre. Nat Bourre said: #Canadian social media case study promoting #healthcare via non-profits: Telus “Like to Give” http://bit.ly/c6prjz @telus @TELUSsupport […]

  2. Nice post Nat.
    Why do organizations initiate a social media campaign before they are prepared to engage?

    A thank you for your mention of @Telus on Twitter is the least they could do. This helps set a courteous, positive tone as well as open the gate for discussion. In my opinion, Telus has missed the opportunity to welcome you as a first follower and help secure you as a supporter. The benefits of that are obvious!!
    Colleen

  3. Nat, through some astute observations, I think you answered your own (and our) question: “Telus will at least be top of mind as part of my research.”
    Top of mind awareness is the brass ring every brand strives for. With the amount of ad dollars it would have taken to get to that goal versus using SM and a trigger (jn this case a sponsorship), the choice for brands considering SM will be easy.
    We’re going to see a lot more ‘engageless’ SM campaigns because, as you’ve pointed out, it’s the easy road.

    IMO, I think if brands are going to ask their captive audience to reach a call for action (I counted 4 clicks), the reward *should* be some kind of engagement / feedback.

    • Thanks for the feedback. I agree that organizations that provide valuable engagement will be the ones to reap the most engagement afterwards. We have to earn our followers’ trust before asking for a favor.

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